Posts Tagged ‘Rehabilitation’

Introduction To Physical Therapy – Rehabilitation Of Amputees And The Advantages Of Physiotherapy

Amputation is a major blow to anyone, both physically and psychologically. To help a person deal with the loss of a limb a team of trained professionals is engaged – a doctor, a prosthetist, a psychologist, and nurses. To rehabilitate an amputee, a physiotherapist is also required.

When a person is adjusting to life without a limb, a physiotherapist is almost indispensable in the patient’s healing process. An amputee has to deal with several physical and physiological issues the. Among these are phantom pains, which are painful sensations that seem to emanate from the limb that has already been removed, as if it still exists. These are nervous responses and require physiotherapy to overcome and treat it. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 29, 2017 at 4:32 am

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Rotator Cuff Exercises – Physical Therapy for Injury Rehabilitation and Strengthening

The rotator cuff is a complex muscles and tendons mechanism that offers unparalleled flexibility and range of motion. Unfortunately, it also offers the opportunity for many injuries or disorders to occur. These are traditionally treated with anti inflammatory medication, injections, hot and cold packs and so on. However, a physical therapy program devised around specific rotator cuff exercises can cut down recovery times, eliminating the need for surgery, strengthening the cuff and preventing future injuries from occurring again.

The 4 muscles of the rotator cuff, the Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor and Subscapularis, are there in place to prevent the shoulder joint from becoming dislocated because of its open ball and socket design, but they are also vulnerable to tears and a variety of disorders like Impingement Syndrome, Bursitis, Tendonitis and Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis). Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 21, 2017 at 4:30 pm

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Physical Therapy for Broken Hip

A broken or fractured hip resulting from a serious fall or accident would require hospitalization. It may not be common among youngsters as they tend to have strong bones which can tolerate the impact better. While surgery may be required for some, physical therapy for broken hip would be necessary for all especially as one would eventually have to overcome pain and restore the body’s range of motion.

Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Sessions

Rehabilitation and therapeutic sessions would commence as soon as possible. Physiotherapists start by helping patients walk. This prevents complications such as blood clots, joint stiffness and worsening of pain. A cane or walker would help patients in moving about gradually. Certain therapeutic exercises would help to improve the body’s strength and mobility. The physiotherapists would assist patients in gait training for balance and coordination. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 19, 2017 at 4:30 am

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Rehabilitation of a Colles Fracture – Physiotherapy

Colles’ fractures, named after Abraham Colles who first described in 1814 the common fracture of the last inch of the radius and ulna near the wrist, is a very common consequence of a fall on the outstretched hand (FOOSH). Typical treatment is immobilisation in a plaster of Paris or similar material for five to six weeks to allow bony union, followed by a rehabilitation period of a month or more, a short period of which might involve a wrist brace for comfort during activity. Due to the functional importance of the hand, the period of immobilisation is kept to a minimum to prevent dysfunction of the hand and wrist.

Physiotherapy examination starts once the hand has been released from the Plaster of Paris, manually feeling the fracture site which should not be more than minimally uncomfortable, signifying the fracture is well on the way to healing. Hand colour should be normal, the hand should not be swollen much nor have severe muscle wasting. Wrist movements are often restricted in one or two planes but all the movements should not normally be reduced or not significantly. Pain may be present but again should not be severe or occur on all hand movements. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 2, 2017 at 4:27 am

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