Posts Tagged ‘Physiotherapy’

Physiotherapy Can Help Cervical Nerve Root Neck Pain

Cervical radiculopathy is a pain syndrome involving one of the cervical nerve roots, with the C7 root (60%) and the C6 root (25%) being the most commonly involved. In younger persons this is due a direct injury which compromises the nerve exit or due to an acute disc prolapse. In older age groups this syndrome can also occur, but in this case is due to narrowing of the nerve exit by arthritic joints and ligament enlargement, disc bulging and bony outgrowths. Cervical nerve root pain referred to physiotherapists for the management of neck pain and arm pain.

The regular lifting of weights over 12 kilograms (25 pounds), operating or driving machinery which vibrates and cigarette smoking are all risk factors for cervical radiculopathy. This kind of neck and arm pain is much less common than the lumbar syndrome of back and leg pain (sciatica). The discs between the cervical vertebrae allow loads to be transmitted down the spine and damp down unwanted shocks. The joint, disc, bone and ligamentous structures form exit spaces for the nerves on the sides of the vertebrae, with up to a third of their space taken up by the nerve. This space can be compromised if degenerative changes occur nearby, leading to nerve compression symptoms.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 27, 2017 at 4:28 am

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Physiotherapy and the Management of Knee Replacement

Major joint replacement is one of the success stories of the late twentieth century, providing the greatest changes in quality of life measurements of all medical treatments or operations. Total knee replacement has now developed from a less predictable operation to a routine procedure with good long-term results for severely osteoarthritic joints. Populations in developed countries are rapidly getting older and total knee replacement is set to overtake total hip replacement as the most performed joint replacement.

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint condition which is more common the older a person becomes, and is the most prevalent joint condition in human populations. The most affected joints vary, with some people having spinal and finger changes whilst other suffer OA of the major joints such as the hips and the knees. Major joint disease is more disabling as it tends to compromise normal mobility and so reduce independence. The patient can suffer from loss of knee movement, reduction of knee power, grating and crunching of the joint and pain, for which weight loss, muscle strengthening, painkilling medication and physiotherapy can be useful. If normal therapies are not successful then knee replacement is the remaining option. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 25, 2017 at 4:28 pm

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Shoulder Rotator Cuff Disease

The rotator cuff is a musculotendinous cuff which surrounds the humeral head and through which the shoulder stabilising and movement muscles exert their forces onto the shoulder. The cuff enables us to put our shoulder through a very large range of motion, the greatest range of any joint in the body, for the purpose of putting our hands in functional positions. The shoulder’s function is to allow our hands to be put in useful positions within our visual field so we can perform the intricate activities that define being human to a degree.

As the muscles approach their insertions on the humeral head they become more and more fibrous until they become wholly tendinous. Many bodily tendons are cylindrical and long but the shoulder tendons are flatter structures which coalesce over the top of the humeral head. The rotator cuff has a relatively poor blood supply and little or no ability to heal and with time and physical stresses tears appear which are often painful but not always so. Rotator cuff tears are a major part of a shoulder surgeon’s work and rotator cuff surgery is common, complex and demands detailed physiotherapy follow up for successful outcomes.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 21, 2017 at 4:36 pm

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Physiotherapy and Stretching

The limitations in flexibility which people exhibit are of interest to a large group of professions from medicine to physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic. Yoga and other eastern traditions have employed stretching techniques called asanas for thousands of years although this was not their primary purpose. The eastern martial arts, such as karate, judo and taekwondo, also emphasise flexibility in the performance of these comprehensive martial ways of living. Flexibility is not precisely defined but in anatomical terms it mostly refers to the ability of joints to go through a particular range of motion.

Ballistic versus Static Stretching

Stretching, when you get down to details, has a lot of controversial and uncertain matters which are unresolved. The pros and cons of static and ballistic stretching is one discussion point. Static stretching is Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 19, 2017 at 4:29 pm

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Physiotherapy Can Help Cervical Nerve Root Neck Pain

Cervical radiculopathy is a pain syndrome involving one of the cervical nerve roots, with the C7 root (60%) and the C6 root (25%) being the most commonly involved. In younger persons this is due a direct injury which compromises the nerve exit or due to an acute disc prolapse. In older age groups this syndrome can also occur, but in this case is due to narrowing of the nerve exit by arthritic joints and ligament enlargement, disc bulging and bony outgrowths. Cervical nerve root pain referred to physiotherapists for the management of neck pain and arm pain.

The regular lifting of weights over 12 kilograms (25 pounds), operating or driving machinery which vibrates and cigarette smoking are all risk factors for cervical radiculopathy. This kind of neck and arm pain is much less common than the lumbar syndrome of back and leg pain (sciatica). The discs between the cervical vertebrae allow loads to be transmitted down the spine and damp down unwanted shocks. The joint, disc, bone and ligamentous structures form exit spaces for the nerves on the sides of the vertebrae, with up to a third of their space taken up by the nerve. This space can be compromised if degenerative changes occur nearby, leading to nerve compression symptoms. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 18, 2017 at 4:30 am

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Beginning a Physiotherapy Career

Copyright (c) 2008 Steven Magill

The physiotherapy career is a healthcare profession which deals with movement disorders of the body arising from certain conditions or illnesses. Treatment through physiotherapy can also be more efficient and cheap than other traditional medication or therapy.

Usually, the person who performs physiotherapy is called a physical therapist. However, there are also other professionals who perform some physiotherapy practices, like chiropractors or caregivers. The physiotherapy career is very broad and has various classifications. Examples of these classifications are psychological sickness, physical rehabilitation, occupational health, and care for the aging. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 17, 2017 at 4:27 am

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Physiotherapy to Treat Sports Injuries

Sports injury just like any injury obtained from other accidents can be absolutely tragic as well as traumatic. The physical and mental stress that are brought by the injury do not discriminate professional athletes from the amateur ones. The injury, if left untreated or not properly managed may actually affect and ultimately ruin the athlete’s promising career. Athletes who are just starting to make a name for themselves in their sports event may find it rather difficult or even impossible to continue in that very physical and competitive field of endeavor. The possibility to incurring physical injuries is part of the risks taken by the athletes regardless of the sports event in which they compete. Knowing what should be done in case of injury is a must for each individual to remember. The good news is, aside from the modern medical technology, physiotherapy has recently been made available to treat specific sports injuries.

The physiotherapy treatment in the case of sports injuries is normally given after the assigned doctors are certain that the patient is already safe for such procedure. Prior to that, doctors may have taken x-rays to determine the gravity of the damage to the bones. If a fracture occurred, broken bones should be set first by keeping the injured part in a cast or a splint to secure it. This is necessary to avoid complications which might worsen the condition and hinder the healing of the bones. Once the cast or splint is removed, the physiotherapists will then begin with their work. Since the muscles were kept inactive for some time, it takes a lot of effort for both the patient and physiotherapist to bring it to its optimum condition. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 16, 2017 at 4:27 pm

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Physiotherapy to Help Pain Management

Copyright (c) 2008 Steven Magill

Chronic pain, especially in the back and in the head, plagues a large percent of the populace. This painful condition might be traced back to an injury or to a disease. Whatever the cause, the anguish that it brings can make one do almost anything to have relief and comfort.

Individuals suffering from this recurring malady usually consult medical doctors for ways of alleviating the agonizing pain that they feel. They often go through a procedure which includes a series of tests to establish the reason of the painful condition and of course the prescription of medications to be taken by the patient. Most of the medications prescribed can do wonders in blocking the pain. Unfortunately, these medications also have ensuing side effects. The consequences can be in the form of damages in the organs like liver and kidneys, or it can be an addiction to the medication. Anti-pain medications such as Vicodin help alleviate the distressing condition of the patient but it is also prone to abuse. An individual can become dependent on these anti-pain medications which make matters worse. This spurred doctors to endorse a combination of medication and the use of physiotherapy to counteract the problem of how to cope with pain. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 4:27 pm

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Shoulder Fracture? Try Physiotherapy

Fractures of the humerus are common and make up about 5% of all fractures, with 80% of them either undisplaced or just minimally displaced. More common in people suffering from osteoporosis, it is common to have a forearm fracture on the same side. Damage to the nerves or circulatory system is possible from these fractures but not often seen. Common areas of fracture are the neck of humerus at the top of the arm(fractured shoulder) and the mid shaft of the arm bone.

A fall onto the outstretched hand, onto the elbow or onto the shoulder itself is the most common cause of a fractured arm. Since many of the arm muscles insert onto the humeral head, when the injury occurs the muscular action involved can displace the fragments and complicate the management. 65 years old is the peak incidence for this kind of fractured humerus and if younger patients suffer this fracture the likely cause will involve high forces such as traffic accidents or sports injury. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 4:28 am

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Physiotherapy VS Physical Therapy Services – What Is the Difference?

Physio, also referred to as physical therapy, can be considered an ancient science, having been used even during the time of Hippocrates, the father of medicine. In modern times, it has grown from simple massaging techniques to more complicated treatments using manual therapy, modalities such as electric current, and ultraviolet light, among others, to address a musculo-skeletal injury or condition.

Early Beginnings of Physical Therapy

In 460 BC, a Greek physician named Hector practiced a technique he called hydrotherapy, which means water treatment in Greek. The UK recognized physical therapy in 1894 as a specialized branch of nursing speciality, which then was regulated by the Chartered Society. Shortly after, official physiotherapy programs were offered by countries such as New Zealand in 1913, and the U.S in 1914. In the United States, the term physical therapy is generally used, and the first recorded practice of physical therapy was noted in the Walter Reed College and Hospital in Portland, Oregon. Read more…

1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - April 15, 2017 at 4:27 pm

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