Posts Tagged ‘Physiotherapy’

Try Physiotherapy for Golfer’s Elbow

How Physiotherapists Treat Golfer’s Elbow
by Jonathan Blood-Smyth

Golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis) is not confined to golfers, but occurs in many sportsmen and women, with racquet sports the most common causes. Other sports where golfer’s elbow occurs are in bowlers in cricket, archers and weightlifters. This and the more common tennis elbow are tendinopathies, overuse syndromes where there is no significant inflammation but a pathological alteration in the body of the tendon at the painful site.

The medial epicondyle is the bone prominence on the inside of the elbow where the forearm and rotatory muscle originate from. The muscles become tendinous near the bone and the tendon inserts into the bone to anchor the muscles. This area is where the pain occurs but no inflammatory process, rather a degenerative one. As the elbow is stresses by forces which would tend to push the elbow out into “knock elbow”, the tendon takes a lot of stress and changes occur.

High stresses occur in the cocking phase of a throw and during the subsequent acceleration, and in the golf swing from high backswing down to near the ball strike. Golfers are more likely to have their dominant hand affected and tennis players who use heavy topspin in their forehands are also more at risk.

The medial epicondyle is the bone prominence on the inside of the elbow where the forearm and rotatory muscle originate from. The muscles become tendinous near the bone and the tendon inserts into the bone to anchor the muscles. This area is where the pain occurs.and scientific work has not shown an inflammatory process but degenerative one. As the elbow is stresses by forces which would tend to push the elbow out into “knock elbow”, the tendon takes a lot of stress and changes occur. High stresses occur in the cocking phase of a throw and during the subsequent acceleration, and in the golf swing from high backswing down to near the ball strike. Golfers are more likely to have their dominant hand affected and tennis players who use heavy topspin in their forehands are also more at risk.

Pain and ache over the front of the medial epicondyle is the typical symptom, worse with repeated flexion of the wrist and improved with resting. Shoulder, elbow, forearm or hand pain can occur, with weakness or pins and needles in the lower arm. Physiotherapy examination includes the bony tendon insertions, the elbow joints and the muscles, with palpation of the “funny bone” area behind the elbow where the ulnar nerve lies. Nerve involvement can give weakness in the forearm muscles and sensory symptoms, so an exclusion neurological examination is performed by the physio.

The main treatment of golfer’s elbow is conservative, including anti-inflammatories, wrist and forearm splinting, corticosteroid injection and physiotherapy. Modifying the provoking activity is a first line of management, making patient education about the condition and the eliciting factors vital. An example is modifying the golf swing mechanics to avoid setting the problem off continually. The patient is taught to avoid aggravating positions and activities, such as leaning on the elbow if there is nerve involvement.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used in the initial acute phase to reduce pain and inflammation along with avoiding painful movements, use of ice, gentle stretches, friction massage and ultrasound. As the problem settles and becomes sub acute the aims change to improving flexibility by stretching, increasing strength and normal activities. A forearm brace may also be used or a wrist brace to rest the wrist muscles. Once the problem is chronic the programme continues with reduced use of the splint and re-introduction of sporting activities.

Correction of sporting technique, such as the golf swing, is best achieved by engaging a professional instructor who can also advise on stretches, fitness work and muscle strengthening. Athletes should warm up well before sport and stretch effectively afterwards, choosing good technique and selection of appropriate equipment. Doctors and therapists may need to monitor patients, especially athletes, very carefully as they tend to continue to perform through the pain.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 18, 2017 at 4:28 pm

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Why Visiting A Physiotherapy Clinic May Be More Important Than You Think

You’ve just experienced an injury. Immediate action for therapy may be more important then you know.

Let’s take the example of a sport related injury. Whenever you see a baseball player or any athlete get hurt, the physiotherapist is usually one of the health professionals that immediately rushes to the injured to help the injured player. It may be just as important to visit a local physiotherapy clinic to ensure minimal recovery time, and prevention of life long chronic pain, if you experience an injury as well. Read more…

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Physiotherapy- A Lucrative Career Option In The Field Of Medicine

Health is the most important asset for leading a hurdle- free life. As usually said, health is wealth; good health is the reason behind a great life. People without any health problems are very happy and usually in a pleasant mood. Mental and physical stress are very much interconnected, so a person who is physically fit, generally has a smooth and calm life overall. Doctors or other professions related to medicine are very famous among the students and most of the medical students aim to become a doctor due to the respect this profession gets.

With the masses getting aware of the side effects of alternative medicines, people are getting more cautious about the methods or the treatments, one undertake to cure a particular disease. Also, with the advancements in technology and the changing work and general lifestyles, discovery of new diseases is also becoming a regular phenomenon. Due to all this, people prefer taking precautions towards the use and practice of their daily habits, to have minimum encounter to the medicinal institutes.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 17, 2017 at 4:29 pm

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Ankle Sprain Physiotherapy Treatment

Sprained ankles are very common and repeated sprains can lead to a swollen, painful ankle, problems walking on rough ground and the risk of re-injury. The physiotherapist begins with asking: How did the injury occur? Was there a high level of force involved? What happened afterwards – could the patient walk or did they go to hospital? Was there an x-ray?

The amount of pain the patient suffered after the injury is extremely important and if the level of pain is very high or if it doesn’t settle, there might be a fracture. Pain should settle with time and if not the physio will refer the patient back to the orthopaedic doctor. The areas of pain should match the mechanism of injury, indicate which structures might be injured and should be tested by the physiotherapist later.

Special questions are asked about the past medical history and previous injuries, any drugs the patient is taking, their appetite level, whether they are losing weight, their sleep quality and pain in the morning, their bladder and bowel normality and any relevant family history. This is to clear the patient of any serious underlying condition so that treatment can be safely performed.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 16, 2017 at 4:31 pm

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Career in PHYSIOTHERAPY

Physiotherapy is a therapeutic treatment concerned with prevention, treatment and management of movement disorders arising from conditions and diseases occurring throughout the lifespan. Physical therapy is performed by either a physical therapist (PT) or a physical therapist assistant (PTA) acting under the direction of a PT.

However, various non-PT health professionals  employ the use of some physical therapeutic modalities in practice. A program of physical therapy will typically also involve a patient’s caregivers. Physiotherapy is the system of treatment of disease and disability using physical exercises. It is a vital rehabilitative service needed in a community and a therapeutic supplement of the medical profession, integral to the treatment of most patients.

Physiotherapy  seeks to improve movement dysfunction, promote optimal health and functions of the human body. It helps in optimal functioning of the body and involves the assessment, maintenance, restoration of the physical function and performance. It is  recommended for people with degenerative disorders, the physically challenged, sportspeople and those suffering from arthritis and neurological disorders etc;

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Physiotherapy to Help Pain Management

Chronic pain, especially in the back and in the head, plagues a large percent of the populace. This painful condition might be traced back to an injury or to a disease. Whatever the cause, the anguish that it brings can make one do almost anything to have relief and comfort.

Individuals suffering from this recurring malady usually consult medical doctors for ways of alleviating the agonizing pain that they feel. They often go through a procedure which includes a series of tests to establish the reason of the painful condition and of course the prescription of medications to be taken by the patient. Most of the medications prescribed can do wonders in blocking the pain. Unfortunately, these medications also have ensuing side effects. The consequences can be in the form of damages in the organs like liver and kidneys, or it can be an addiction to the medication. Anti-pain medications such as Vicodin help alleviate the distressing condition of the patient but it is also prone to abuse. An individual can become dependent on these anti-pain medications which make matters worse. This spurred doctors to endorse a combination of medication and the use of physiotherapy to counteract the problem of how to cope with pain.

This has brought forth a growth of pain management clinics. An option has been given to chronic pain sufferers. Physiotherapy offers alternative ways to manage pain and patients are given a choice to cope with the situation without the after-effects of anti-pain medications.

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 12, 2017 at 4:30 pm

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Physiotherapy and Back Exercises

The cost of low back pain to society is very great, with high financial costs in terms of lost income, lost production and time off work and the costs of medical and physiotherapy and other treatments. This is apart from the personal consequences of the loss of one’s work or job role, loss of the ability to do normal activities and the pain itself. Many back pain treatments have been developed, most of which do not have high levels of effectiveness, and much is down to self management. An exercise programme has been shown to be an important aspect of this and this includes stability work, gym or aerobic exercise and lumbar and pelvic ranges of movement.

Joint ranges of movement are not obvious to most of us but are vital to our ability to perform day to day activities. The shoulder is an important example of a highly functional joint which allows us to place our hands in front of our vision so we can perform precise actions. To do this it has a very large range of movement, allowing us to put our arms behind the back, behind the neck and right above the head. A joint can change due to Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 11, 2017 at 4:34 am

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Treating Lumbar Spinal Pain by Physiotherapy

Low back pain is very common and most people have some experience of a back pain episode at some time of life. Attendances at physiotherapy clinics for low back pain are very high so physios have a variety of assessment and treatment techniques to manage spinal pain and improve patients’ function.

A serious medical condition such as cancer or infection is a very uncommon cause of back pain, but several medical problems can present this way and physiotherapists need to be aware of this so they can refer the patient on to the appropriate doctor. The physio will ask about past medical history (cancer, arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy), any loss of weight or appetite, bladder and bowel control, feeling unwell, sleep disturbance and worse pain when lying down to sleep.

The physio is looking for the patient to react as if they have mechanical spinal pain, a condition where normal physical stresses such as sitting or walking have a worsening or easing affect on the pain. The examination starts by observing the posture and movement of the patient during the questioning and the physio follows this by examining the spinal posture and ranges of movement. Abnormalities of posture are common and not always important, with leg length differences, a reduction or increase in the back curves and a scoliosis being common findings.

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Handling and Physiotherapy Management of Lacerated Achilles Tendon

Physiotherapy and Medical Treatment of Achilles Tendon Rupture
by Jonathan Blood-Smyth

The largest and the strongest tendon in the body is the Achilles tendon in the distal posterior calf. Typical patients with Achilles tendon rupture are men in good health from 30-50 years old and who have not suffered major injuries or any kind of difficulty with the leg before. Rupture occurs typically in people who have not been recently active and who may indulge in infrequent physical activity such as playing weekend sport, players known as “weekend warriors”. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 7, 2017 at 4:35 am

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Physiotherapy of Your Shoulder

The function of the human arm is to allow placement of the hand in useful positions so the hands can perform activities where the eyes can see them. Because of the huge range of positions required the shoulder is very flexible with a large motion range, but this is at the expense of some reduced strength and greatly reduced stability. A “soft tissue joint” is often a description of the shoulder, indicating it is the tendons, muscles and ligaments which are important to the joint’s function. Shoulder treatment and rehabilitation is a core physiotherapy skill.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 6, 2017 at 4:46 pm

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