Posts Tagged ‘Physiotherapist’

Physiotherapy – Joint Position Sense

The human sensory system is designed to give us the information we need to manage the challenges of the world. We take in vast amounts of information every minute of the day, much of it not relevant, the brain deciding what is important and what is not. We are familiar with vision, hearing and touch and consciously and unconsciously use the incoming information to guide our actions and responses in daily life. However, there are two more sensory input systems, related to the others, which are vital to normal functioning. These are the sensory feedback we get from our bodies and the joint position sense.

Profound loss of sensory input is more common than we think as it happens every time we get a numb, dead feeling arm when we wake up. When I woke up with my arm completely numb I moved if off my chest grumpily twice until I began to understand, by feeling the arm gradually from the elbow up, that it was my own arm I was trying to get rid of. The loss of sensibility was so great that as far as I was concerned the arm did not exist and therefore must have belonged to someone else. Without our sensory input we are limited in our abilities.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 14, 2017 at 4:34 pm

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Treating Lumbar Spinal Pain by Physiotherapy

Low back pain is very common and most people have some experience of a back pain episode at some time of life. Attendances at physiotherapy clinics for low back pain are very high so physios have a variety of assessment and treatment techniques to manage spinal pain and improve patients’ function.

A serious medical condition such as cancer or infection is a very uncommon cause of back pain, but several medical problems can present this way and physiotherapists need to be aware of this so they can refer the patient on to the appropriate doctor. The physio will ask about past medical history (cancer, arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy), any loss of weight or appetite, bladder and bowel control, feeling unwell, sleep disturbance and worse pain when lying down to sleep.

The physio is looking for the patient to react as if they have mechanical spinal pain, a condition where normal physical stresses such as sitting or walking have a worsening or easing affect on the pain. The examination starts by observing the posture and movement of the patient during the questioning and the physio follows this by examining the spinal posture and ranges of movement. Abnormalities of posture are common and not always important, with leg length differences, a reduction or increase in the back curves and a scoliosis being common findings.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 11, 2017 at 3:35 am

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Physiotherapy of Your Shoulder

The function of the human arm is to allow placement of the hand in useful positions so the hands can perform activities where the eyes can see them. Because of the huge range of positions required the shoulder is very flexible with a large motion range, but this is at the expense of some reduced strength and greatly reduced stability. A “soft tissue joint” is often a description of the shoulder, indicating it is the tendons, muscles and ligaments which are important to the joint’s function. Shoulder treatment and rehabilitation is a core physiotherapy skill.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 6, 2017 at 4:46 pm

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Try Physiotherapy for Golfer’s Elbow

Golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis) is not confined to golfers, but occurs in many sportsmen and women, with racquet sports the most common causes. Other sports where golfer’s elbow occurs are in bowlers in cricket, archers and weightlifters. This and the more common tennis elbow are tendinopathies, overuse syndromes where there is no significant inflammation but a pathological alteration in the body of the tendon at the painful site.

The medial epicondyle is the bone prominence on the inside of the elbow where the forearm and rotatory muscle originate from. The muscles become tendinous near the bone and the tendon inserts into the bone to anchor the muscles. This area is where the pain occurs but no inflammatory process, rather a degenerative one. As the elbow is stresses by forces which would tend to push the elbow out into “knock elbow”, the tendon takes a lot of stress and changes occur.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - October 5, 2017 at 4:34 pm

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What Is Physiotherapy and Is It Something You Should Consider for Your Pain?

Whether due to trauma or repetitive motion, which over time can cause injury, the result is the same: pain and limited range of physical movement in that region of your body. The method you use for treatment is the focus of this article. We are human beings who dislike any deterioration in our health and most of us will look for the easiest and quickest means of relieving the discomfort.

Against our better judgment, rather than seek the advice of a doctor, we open a bottle of something – generally speaking something that is available over the counter, in hopes of feeling normal and pain-free. While this is not the worst thing you can do, after all, many over the counter drugs contain an anti-inflammatory, which will assist in reducing the throbbing and swelling, depending upon the severity, you may need something more to encourage healthy tissue and/or muscle. If you are noticing that things are not improving, it is time to see what sort of rehabilitation physiotherapists can offer you. The last thing you want is something that is relatively simple to treat with physiotherapy becoming such a nuisance that you find yourself in constant pain or in need of surgery. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - September 27, 2017 at 4:30 pm

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Physiotherapy Can Help Cervical Nerve Root Neck Pain

Cervical radiculopathy is a pain syndrome involving one of the cervical nerve roots, with the C7 root (60%) and the C6 root (25%) being the most commonly involved. In younger persons this is due a direct injury which compromises the nerve exit or due to an acute disc prolapse. In older age groups this syndrome can also occur, but in this case is due to narrowing of the nerve exit by arthritic joints and ligament enlargement, disc bulging and bony outgrowths. Cervical nerve root pain referred to physiotherapists for the management of neck pain and arm pain.

The regular lifting of weights over 12 kilograms (25 pounds), operating or driving machinery which vibrates and cigarette smoking are all risk factors for cervical radiculopathy. This kind of neck and arm pain is much less common than the lumbar syndrome of back and leg pain (sciatica). The discs between the cervical vertebrae allow loads to be transmitted down the spine and damp down unwanted shocks. The joint, disc, bone and ligamentous structures form exit spaces for the nerves on the sides of the vertebrae, with up to a third of their space taken up by the nerve. This space can be compromised if degenerative changes occur nearby, leading to nerve compression symptoms.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - September 15, 2017 at 4:28 pm

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Simple Tips to Find a Reliable Physiotherapist

Without question, a physiotherapist i can really help treat your physical problems. Whether it is a neck issue, headaches, back pain or a sprained ankle, a phyios can help relief your problem. Below are 6 simple tips you can use today to find a suitable phyisotherapist.

1. Ask your friends or relatives if they have had any god experience with a physiotherapist. From my own personal experience, I found my physiotherapist through a recommendation from my Mother. As both of us suffer from back problems, she was my first natural choice about her treatment. Till today, I have been using the same physiotherapist. For sure, references from your circle of trust is simply the best. So ask around from people you know and trust. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - September 5, 2017 at 4:32 pm

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Is There a Difference Between Physiotherapist and Physical Therapist in Singapore? Look for a Specialised Physiotherapy Treatment that works!

Is There a Difference Between Physiotherapist and Physical Therapist in Singapore? Look for a Specialised Physiotherapy Treatment that works!

The term physical therapist and physiotherapist are exchangeable. The term physical therapist started in the United States, and physiotherapist has always been used in the UK. In Singapore, you’ll find most people use the term ‘physiotherapist’. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - August 25, 2017 at 4:40 pm

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