Posts Tagged ‘Alternative Medicine’

Physiotherapy of Your Shoulder

The function of the human arm is to allow placement of the hand in useful positions so the hands can perform activities where the eyes can see them. Because of the huge range of positions required the shoulder is very flexible with a large motion range, but this is at the expense of some reduced strength and greatly reduced stability. A “soft tissue joint” is often a description of the shoulder, indicating it is the tendons, muscles and ligaments which are important to the joint’s function. Shoulder treatment and rehabilitation is a core physiotherapy skill.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 16, 2017 at 4:27 pm

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Physiotherapy – Pain Syndromes

The gleno-humeral joint, known in lay terms as the shoulder, is a vital part of the links in the upper limb and responsible for our ability to place our hands where we can see them to perform activities. Because flexibility is a prime requirement the shoulder is a less stable joint with moderate muscle power and a large range of motion. It is described as a “soft tissue joint”, implying that the joint’s functional ability is dependent on its soft and not its hard components. Physiotherapists are closely involved in treating and rehabilitating the shoulder, dealing with the muscles, ligaments and tendons.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 4:28 am

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