Archive for May, 2017

Physiotherapy – Management of Hip Replacement

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the commonest joint degeneration condition in the world, resulting in huge amounts of pain and suffering, work loss, expense and disability. Ageing of western developed populations, soon to be followed by some developing countries such as China, will place an increasing burden on medical services as the occurrence of OA rises steadily with age. There will be an increasing need to provide medical and physiotherapy treatment for OA over the next 50 years and for many thousands of people this will involve joint replacement.Â

Medical interventions can be rated on a scale which calculates the improvement in quality of life which results and here hip replacement comes out top of all treatments. The 1960s saw its development into a standard treatment for hip arthritis but the 21st century has seen the technique evolve into a complex and predictable approach to many hip conditions, with excellent fifteen year plus results. Once conservative treatments have been exhausted due to a worsening joint then joint replacement becomes the standard choice. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 31, 2017 at 4:31 pm

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The Origins Of Physiotherapy

At least as early as the days of Hippocrates, massage was used and the history of physiotherapy was begun.  The practice of physiotherapy has evolved through the centuries from the earliest forms to the complex system of treatment it is now.

In 460 B.C. Hector was using a type of physiotherapy called hydrotherapy, or water therapy.  Professionals use this type of therapy today, although it is more specialized for each type of condition that the patients have.   Read more…

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Stroke Recovery – All You Need To Know

I am saddened to think that stroke recovery is sometimes trapped in an outdated and dogmatic approach to help people with their stroke recovery. But the sad truth is unless you are one of the very fortunate ones, either geographically to be located next to a cutting edge stroke rehabilitation facility or the monetary means to afford such treatment, you are stuck with the stock standard cookie cutter approach to stroke treatment. And there is a good chance that it is stuck in the past.

Myths surrounding stroke recovery may be perpetuated by a number of factors. It seems that once something has been printed in a newspaper or magazine it is taken as gospel. Many of the belief surrounding the brain have been around for a long time and despite new research dispelling the myth, it takes a long time for this to filter into mainstream belief systems. This can clearly be seen with all the out dated beliefs in the exercise and fitness world. This article will discuss three main myths surrounding stroke recovery. Firstly that the brain is set in stone and cannot change. Secondly that there is only a small window of opportunity for stroke recovery to happen. And the last myth is that there are not better and more effective ways to perform stroke rehabilitation. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 30, 2017 at 4:31 pm

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Rotator Cuff Exercises – Physical Therapy for Injury Rehabilitation and Strengthening

The rotator cuff is a complex muscles and tendons mechanism that offers unparalleled flexibility and range of motion. Unfortunately, it also offers the opportunity for many injuries or disorders to occur. These are traditionally treated with anti inflammatory medication, injections, hot and cold packs and so on. However, a physical therapy program devised around specific rotator cuff exercises can cut down recovery times, eliminating the need for surgery, strengthening the cuff and preventing future injuries from occurring again.

The 4 muscles of the rotator cuff, the Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor and Subscapularis, are there in place to prevent the shoulder joint from becoming dislocated because of its open ball and socket design, but they are also vulnerable to tears and a variety of disorders like Impingement Syndrome, Bursitis, Tendonitis and Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis). Read more…

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Chiropractors: Not Mere Healers But System Practitioners

Other than the acupuncture that doesn’t use medication there exists another science and medical vocation that has also been sustaining for more than 100 years now, that is no less than Chiropractic treatment by a chiropractor.

Since the earliest times, it has been depicted as holistic medicine because it doesn’t only reflect on your physical welfare but it also takes into account the patients’ physical health. You may be thinking whether chiropractor’s have any therapeutic claims, well I am happy to inform you that as a system the advancement that they are employing to alleviate the musculo-skeletal system as well as nervous system disorders have proven its outcome in curing pains at the back, in the neck, on the head and to other portions of the body. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 29, 2017 at 4:27 pm

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Rheumatoid Arthritis: Energy Conservation For Our Patients Part 2

There are many equipments and tools that have been created to enable living comfortably for a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, they enable mobility and function, as well as protect joints from additional trauma or damage by positioning the joints in optimal biomechanical position.

We must understand that with a new rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis, the patient with be given and taught a lot of information with regards to the management of joints, pain, energy conservation, joint protection, equipment and tools etc – there is a limit of how much a patient can understand and retain, so it’d be a good idea for continuity of care and protection information by creating an information sheet or booklet. This booklet should be informative in terms of definition, exercises, what activities to avoid, what equipments to purchase and how to use them. Read more…

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Ask Your Osteopathy Physician the Right Questions

You have been hearing about osteopathy and the benefits it can have on your health from close friends and you decide it is time you too consulted one for the various aches and pains that you have been suffering from. Since there are so many osteopaths practicing in your city, how will you be able to find out the right doctor for you? Ask these simple questions during your first appointment to ensure that you enlist the services of a practitioner who can understand and treat your problems successfully.

Would I have to take treatment for my entire body even though I only suffer from chronic backache?

A skilled osteopath will be able to explain to you why it is necessary to treat your entire body even though your complaint is restricted to one area. All the bones in our body are linked intricately and a problem in one part of the body can have an effect in another part. Sometimes chronic back ache may result from the spine compression, hence it becomes necessary to treat both the spine as well as the back muscles to address your back pain. If the osteopath focuses on just one area, he may miss out the complaints in the other parts and not provide you holistic healing for your entire body. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 28, 2017 at 4:34 pm

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Dealing With A Swollen Knee

When a knee becomes swollen it causes proper movement to become difficult. It is likely that it also causes stiffness and tightness in the joint. Doctors see more patients with swollen knees than any other type of knee problem. It is especially important to see a doctor if you have been experiencing swelling for more than 48 hours or having a lot of pain with it.

Arthritis is the most common cause of knee swelling. There are also a number of other things that can cause it including: infection, cruciate ligament tear, injury, meniscal tear, strain during exercise, collateral ligament tear, softening of the cartilage, fluid build up due to infection, tendinitis, bursitis and gout. Read more…

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Physical Therapy for Broken Hip

A broken or fractured hip resulting from a serious fall or accident would require hospitalization. It may not be common among youngsters as they tend to have strong bones which can tolerate the impact better. While surgery may be required for some, physical therapy for broken hip would be necessary for all especially as one would eventually have to overcome pain and restore the body’s range of motion.

Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Sessions

Rehabilitation and therapeutic sessions would commence as soon as possible. Physiotherapists start by helping patients walk. This prevents complications such as blood clots, joint stiffness and worsening of pain. A cane or walker would help patients in moving about gradually. Certain therapeutic exercises would help to improve the body’s strength and mobility. The physiotherapists would assist patients in gait training for balance and coordination. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 27, 2017 at 4:34 pm

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Try Physiotherapy for Golfer’s Elbow

How Physiotherapists Treat Golfer’s Elbow
by Jonathan Blood-Smyth

Golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylitis) is not confined to golfers, but occurs in many sportsmen and women, with racquet sports the most common causes. Other sports where golfer’s elbow occurs are in bowlers in cricket, archers and weightlifters. This and the more common tennis elbow are tendinopathies, overuse syndromes where there is no significant inflammation but a pathological alteration in the body of the tendon at the painful site.

The medial epicondyle is the bone prominence on the inside of the elbow where the forearm and rotatory muscle originate from. The muscles become tendinous near the bone and the tendon inserts into the bone to anchor the muscles. This area is where the pain occurs but no inflammatory process, rather a degenerative one. As the elbow is stresses by forces which would tend to push the elbow out into “knock elbow”, the tendon takes a lot of stress and changes occur.

High stresses occur in the cocking phase of a throw and during the subsequent acceleration, and in the golf swing from high backswing down to near the ball strike. Golfers are more likely to have their dominant hand affected and tennis players who use heavy topspin in their forehands are also more at risk.

The medial epicondyle is the bone prominence on the inside of the elbow where the forearm and rotatory muscle originate from. The muscles become tendinous near the bone and the tendon inserts into the bone to anchor the muscles. This area is where the pain occurs.and scientific work has not shown an inflammatory process but degenerative one. As the elbow is stresses by forces which would tend to push the elbow out into “knock elbow”, the tendon takes a lot of stress and changes occur. High stresses occur in the cocking phase of a throw and during the subsequent acceleration, and in the golf swing from high backswing down to near the ball strike. Golfers are more likely to have their dominant hand affected and tennis players who use heavy topspin in their forehands are also more at risk.

Pain and ache over the front of the medial epicondyle is the typical symptom, worse with repeated flexion of the wrist and improved with resting. Shoulder, elbow, forearm or hand pain can occur, with weakness or pins and needles in the lower arm. Physiotherapy examination includes the bony tendon insertions, the elbow joints and the muscles, with palpation of the “funny bone” area behind the elbow where the ulnar nerve lies. Nerve involvement can give weakness in the forearm muscles and sensory symptoms, so an exclusion neurological examination is performed by the physio.

The main treatment of golfer’s elbow is conservative, including anti-inflammatories, wrist and forearm splinting, corticosteroid injection and physiotherapy. Modifying the provoking activity is a first line of management, making patient education about the condition and the eliciting factors vital. An example is modifying the golf swing mechanics to avoid setting the problem off continually. The patient is taught to avoid aggravating positions and activities, such as leaning on the elbow if there is nerve involvement.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used in the initial acute phase to reduce pain and inflammation along with avoiding painful movements, use of ice, gentle stretches, friction massage and ultrasound. As the problem settles and becomes sub acute the aims change to improving flexibility by stretching, increasing strength and normal activities. A forearm brace may also be used or a wrist brace to rest the wrist muscles. Once the problem is chronic the programme continues with reduced use of the splint and re-introduction of sporting activities.

Correction of sporting technique, such as the golf swing, is best achieved by engaging a professional instructor who can also advise on stretches, fitness work and muscle strengthening. Athletes should warm up well before sport and stretch effectively afterwards, choosing good technique and selection of appropriate equipment. Doctors and therapists may need to monitor patients, especially athletes, very carefully as they tend to continue to perform through the pain.

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