Physiotherapy to Treat Sports Injuries

Sports injury just like any injury obtained from other accidents can be absolutely tragic as well as traumatic. The physical and mental stress that are brought by the injury do not discriminate professional athletes from the amateur ones. The injury, if left untreated or not properly managed may actually affect and ultimately ruin the athlete’s promising career. Athletes who are just starting to make a name for themselves in their sports event may find it rather difficult or even impossible to continue in that very physical and competitive field of endeavor. The possibility to incurring physical injuries is part of the risks taken by the athletes regardless of the sports event in which they compete. Knowing what should be done in case of injury is a must for each individual to remember. The good news is, aside from the modern medical technology, physiotherapy has recently been made available to treat specific sports injuries.

The physiotherapy treatment in the case of sports injuries is normally given after the assigned doctors are certain that the patient is already safe for such procedure. Prior to that, doctors may have taken x-rays to determine the gravity of the damage to the bones. If a fracture occurred, broken bones should be set first by keeping the injured part in a cast or a splint to secure it. This is necessary to avoid complications which might worsen the condition and hinder the healing of the bones. Once the cast or splint is removed, the physiotherapists will then begin with their work. Since the muscles were kept inactive for some time, it takes a lot of effort for both the patient and physiotherapist to bring it to its optimum condition. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 26, 2017 at 4:28 am

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Shoulder Fracture? Try Physiotherapy

Fractures of the humerus are common and make up about 5% of all fractures, with 80% of them either undisplaced or just minimally displaced. More common in people suffering from osteoporosis, it is common to have a forearm fracture on the same side. Damage to the nerves or circulatory system is possible from these fractures but not often seen. Common areas of fracture are the neck of humerus at the top of the arm(fractured shoulder) and the mid shaft of the arm bone.

A fall onto the outstretched hand, onto the elbow or onto the shoulder itself is the most common cause of a fractured arm. Since many of the arm muscles insert onto the humeral head, when the injury occurs the muscular action involved can displace the fragments and complicate the management. 65 years old is the peak incidence for this kind of fractured humerus and if younger patients suffer this fracture the likely cause will involve high forces such as traffic accidents or sports injury. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 25, 2017 at 4:33 pm

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Physiotherapy VS Physical Therapy Services – What Is the Difference?

Physio, also referred to as physical therapy, can be considered an ancient science, having been used even during the time of Hippocrates, the father of medicine. In modern times, it has grown from simple massaging techniques to more complicated treatments using manual therapy, modalities such as electric current, and ultraviolet light, among others, to address a musculo-skeletal injury or condition.

Early Beginnings of Physical Therapy

In 460 BC, a Greek physician named Hector practiced a technique he called hydrotherapy, which means water treatment in Greek. The UK recognized physical therapy in 1894 as a specialized branch of nursing speciality, which then was regulated by the Chartered Society. Shortly after, official physiotherapy programs were offered by countries such as New Zealand in 1913, and the U.S in 1914. In the United States, the term physical therapy is generally used, and the first recorded practice of physical therapy was noted in the Walter Reed College and Hospital in Portland, Oregon. Read more…

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1 comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - at 4:30 am

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Why Use Physiotherapy to Treat Back Pain

Copyright (c) 2008 Steven Magill

Physiotherapy dates back to the ancient times but the modern practice of this allied medical care started in the 1920s. It is used to address conditions like recurring pain, musculoskeletal disorders, and movement disorders. The health care professional who is trained in this field of endeavour is known as a physiotherapist or a physical therapist.

Nowadays, the services of physiotherapists are widely sought by a large number of people who suffer from a wide variety of afflictions. The most common of which is back ache. It used to be that when an individual has backache, he goes directly to a doctor. At present, he has another option and that is to engage the assistance of a physical therapist. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 24, 2017 at 4:29 pm

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Physiotherapy of Your Shoulder

The function of the human arm is to allow placement of the hand in useful positions so the hands can perform activities where the eyes can see them. Because of the huge range of positions required the shoulder is very flexible with a large motion range, but this is at the expense of some reduced strength and greatly reduced stability. A “soft tissue joint” is often a description of the shoulder, indicating it is the tendons, muscles and ligaments which are important to the joint’s function. Shoulder treatment and rehabilitation is a core physiotherapy skill.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle. Read more…

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Physiotherapy for Arthritic Pets

There have been great advances in the medical management of arthritis in pets but only recently has the veterinary world embraced the multitude of theories and complimentary therapies widely used within the medical world. One of the most proven methods of maintaining mobility in arthritic joints is physiotherapy (otherwise known as physical therapy) and the more advanced the mobility problems are, the more important this complimentary therapy becomes. In this article I hope to introduce you to the concepts and terminology of physiotherapy so that you can approach your veterinarian and see whether it may benefit your pet.

Warming up before exercise

We all know we should warm up before exercise and this applies for pets too, especially if they have stiffened joints due to arthritis. Warming up literally means warming up the muscles. This reduces the stiffness in the ligaments, tendons and muscles and also greatly increases blood supply and oxygen to the limbs. A method used in physiotherapy is to use warm compresses to emulate this warming up proces in particularly stiff joints. Simply take a warm hand towel and place it in a plastic bag (please ensure that it is not too hot) and apply it to the stiff joints. This is especially useful first thing in the morning when your pet awakes as this is the time tha joints will be at their stiffest. Once the joints are warmed up they can then be flexed and extended passively to increase the lossening of stiff muscles and connective tissues. Do this for 5 minutes before exercise and when your pet starts the day to help soothe and prepare their stiff joints for exercise. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 23, 2017 at 4:28 pm

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Physiotherapy and Stretching

The limitations in flexibility which people exhibit are of interest to a large group of professions from medicine to physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic. Yoga and other eastern traditions have employed stretching techniques called asanas for thousands of years although this was not their primary purpose. The eastern martial arts, such as karate, judo and taekwondo, also emphasise flexibility in the performance of these comprehensive martial ways of living. Flexibility is not precisely defined but in anatomical terms it mostly refers to the ability of joints to go through a particular range of motion.

Ballistic versus Static Stretching

Stretching, when you get down to details, has a lot of controversial and uncertain matters which are unresolved. The pros and cons of static and ballistic stretching is one discussion point. Static stretching is overwhelmingly more common but most activities and sports have a large dynamic component so ballistic stretching may reflect more accurately the actual physical challenges. Ballistic stretching can be more interesting and reduce the boredom associated with static regimes. Read more…

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Physiotherapy – Pain Syndromes

The gleno-humeral joint, known in lay terms as the shoulder, is a vital part of the links in the upper limb and responsible for our ability to place our hands where we can see them to perform activities. Because flexibility is a prime requirement the shoulder is a less stable joint with moderate muscle power and a large range of motion. It is described as a “soft tissue joint”, implying that the joint’s functional ability is dependent on its soft and not its hard components. Physiotherapists are closely involved in treating and rehabilitating the shoulder, dealing with the muscles, ligaments and tendons.

The shoulder joint is constructed from the socket of the scapula and the humeral head, the ball at the top of the upper arm bone. The head of the upper arm is a large ball and important tendons insert onto it to move and stabilise the shoulder, but the shoulder socket, the glenoid, is small in comparison and very shallow. A cartilage rim, the labrum of the glenoid, deepens the socket and adds to stability. The acromio-clavicular joint lies above the shoulder joint proper and provides dynamic stability during arm movements, being made up from part of the scapula and the outer end of the clavicle. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 22, 2017 at 4:32 pm

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Physiotherapy and Back Exercises

The cost of low back pain to society is very great, with high financial costs in terms of lost income, lost production and time off work and the costs of medical and physiotherapy and other treatments. This is apart from the personal consequences of the loss of one’s work or job role, loss of the ability to do normal activities and the pain itself. Many back pain treatments have been developed, most of which do not have high levels of effectiveness, and much is down to self management. An exercise programme has been shown to be an important aspect of this and this includes stability work, gym or aerobic exercise and lumbar and pelvic ranges of movement.

Joint ranges of movement are not obvious to most of us but are vital to our ability to perform day to day activities. The shoulder is an important example of a highly functional joint which allows us to place our hands in front of our vision so we can perform precise actions. To do this it has a very large range of movement, allowing us to put our arms behind the back, behind the neck and right above the head. A joint can change due to illness or injury with various effects from loss of joint movement, looseness of the ligaments or damage to the joint surfaces themselves. Read more…

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Ankle Sprain Physiotherapy Treatment

Sprained ankles are very common and repeated sprains can lead to a swollen, painful ankle, problems walking on rough ground and the risk of re-injury. The physiotherapist begins with asking: How did the injury occur? Was there a high level of force involved? What happened afterwards – could the patient walk or did they go to hospital? Was there an x-ray?

The amount of pain the patient suffered after the injury is extremely important and if the level of pain is very high or if it doesn’t settle, there might be a fracture. Pain should settle with time and if not the physio will refer the patient back to the orthopaedic doctor. The areas of pain should match the mechanism of injury, indicate which structures might be injured and should be tested by the physiotherapist later. Read more…

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - June 21, 2017 at 4:29 pm

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